Sunday, October 07, 2063

Welcome!

Update 3/9/2014 10:38



Caricature by Lar DeSouza
I'm finally updating the welcome post which is only able to sit at the top of this dated blog because it's post-posted 49 years into the future.  The last update was 7 years ago.

When I first began this blog back in late 2004, It was for the purpose of hosting videos documenting the Westcoast Origami Guild- I believe the longest, most established origami folding group in the greater LA area.

Since that time, Have Paper Will Travel has evolved.  It's more an aggregate blog for all sorts of origami and origami-related items floating around out there that I find interesting; and which I may think readers and followers out there might also find of interest.

There is so much content on the internet these days, it's hard to follow it all.  

My sidebar is one of the largest collections of origami-content links in one place.  FYI, it gets updated periodically with new links as I find them.  I should alert readers whenever I add something new, but haven't been (yet).  If you'd like your site or photo album linked and don't see it in the sidebar (check around very carefully and under the proper category), just let me know.  There are sooooo many photo albums out there (it seems almost every folder on the planet has one), I could spend all day collecting up links and still have more to go.

 I'd like to do what I can to expand the audience and draw more attention to noteworthy sites and folders; to bring more exposure to the art and science of paperfolding; and to bring more people into "the fold".

  There are so many great folders out there on the level of well-known luminaries like Satoshi Kamiya, Brian Chan, and Robert Lang.  I think this especially began to happen after Dr. Lang published "Origami Design Secrets", which I've still not taken the time to sit down and study (let alone fold much from). 

Anyway, thanks to everyone who comes by and takes something of usefulness away from here.  Feel free to drop in a comment for any suggestions.  

I realize that those viewing on mobile devices may have a difficult time reading the lighter colored font.  I still do not like the background layout of what blogger did to this blog and may eventually update the layout again when I have the time and energy to research into it.  In the meantime....

michael

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Angel Blanco's Self-Closing Box




Source

One of my favorite containers.  I am glad it's more freely out there in public.  Angel shared this, but a bit more obscure as I think it was only accessible if you visited his FB.

When I had the die made to stamp the crease pattern onto cardstock to make his model easier for beginners to fold, I had asked him for permission to do so.

Monday, April 29, 2019

Some sights and sounds from the Monterey Park Cherry Blossom Festival






My exhibit display:

The Origins of the Chinese Fortune Cookie Started with a Japanese-American






I've seen Brian Kito do his mochi & manju stage demonstration for over a decade, each year at the Monterey Park Cherry Blossom Festival; but usually I'm too busy at my own tables to pay close attention.

This year I was happy to be able to take a break and watch and film his demo. I was shocked to learn about the murky origins of the Chinese fortune cookie; and how that in all likelihood, it's a Japanese-American invention.

Sorry about the audio quality, but listen to Brian explain how the origin has been traced back to his grandfather.


http://www.fugetsu-do.com/history.htm

From Wikipedia:

Seiichi Kito, the founder of Fugetsu-do of Little Tokyo in Los Angeles, also claims to have invented the cookie.[8] Kito claims to have gotten the idea of putting a message in a cookie from Omikuji (fortune slip) which are sold at temples and shrines in Japan. According to his story, he sold his cookies to Chinese restaurants where they were greeted with much enthusiasm in both the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas. Thus Kito's main claim is that he is responsible for the cookie being so strongly associated with Chinese restaurants.[citation needed]
Up to around World War II, fortune cookies were known as "fortune tea cakes"—likely reflecting their origins in Japanese tea cakes.[2]
Fortune cookies moved from being a confection dominated by Japanese-Americans to one dominated by Chinese-Americans sometime around World War II. One theory for why this occurred is because of the Japanese American internment during World War II, which forcibly put over 100,000 Japanese-Americans in internment camps, including those who had produced fortune cookies. This gave an opportunity for Chinese manufacturers.

Thursday, March 21, 2019

LA Times Blurb from 2018 Descanso Gardens

Yesterday I discovered this LA Times mention of our teaching origami last year at Descanso Gardens.  It includes a nice photo story:


Lisa Lashaway of Montrose shows off her finished Origami Thai tulip she made during the Descanso Gardens Origami Hands-On Demonstration, led by instructor Michael Sanders, at the La Cañada Flintridge landmark on Saturday, March 3, 2018. There were two sessions where about 30 people learned how to make two origami items, including the Thai tulip and a children’s spinner. Participants ranged in age from young children to older adults. All materials for the origami were provided to the attendees. (Raul Roa / Staff Photographer)


Kathleen Garcia of La Crescenta folds a piece of paper to finish up the flower part of her Origami Thai tulip during the Descanso Gardens Origami Hands-On Demonstration, led by instructor Michael Sanders, at the La Cañada Flintridge landmark on Saturday, March 3, 2018. There were two sessions where about 30 people learned how to make two origami items, including the Thai tulip and a children's spinner. Participants ranged in age from young children to older adults. All materials for the origami were provided to the attendees. (Raul Roa / Staff Photographer)



Muffit Jensen of Sun Valley looks over her finished Origami Thai tulip during the Descanso Gardens Origami Hands-On Demonstration, led by instructor Michael Sanders, at the La Cañada Flintridge landmark on Saturday, March 3, 2018. There were two sessions where about 30 people learned how to make two origami items, including the Thai tulip and a children's spinner. Participants ranged in age from young children to older adults. All materials for the origami were provided to the attendees. (Raul Roa / Staff Photographer

Finished Origami Thai tulips are placed next to a larger sample during the Descanso Gardens Origami Hands-On Demonstration, led by instructor Michael Sanders, at the La Cañada Flintridge landmark on Saturday, March 3, 2018. There were two sessions where about 30 people learned how to make two origami items, including the Thai tulip and a children's spinner. Participants ranged in age from young children to older adults. All materials for the origami were provided to the attendees. (Raul Roa / Staff Photographer)




Instructor Michael Sanders helps out Beckett Wasson and his grandmother Vicky Adik, of Pasadena, with their Origami Thai tulips during the Descanso Gardens Origami Hands-On Demonstration, led by instructor Michael Sanders, at the La Cañada Flintridge landmark on Saturday, March 3, 2018. There were two sessions where about 30 people learned how to make two origami items, including the Thai tulip and a children's spinner. Participants ranged in age from young children to older adults. All materials for the origami were provided to the attendees. (Raul Roa / Staff Photographer)

Instructor Michael Sanders shows how to fold paper while creating an Origami Thai tulip during the Descanso Gardens Origami Hands-On Demonstration, led by instructor Michael Sanders at the La Cañada Flintridge landmark on Saturday, March 3, 2018. There were two sessions where about 30 people learned how to make two origami items, including the Thai tulip and a children's spinner. Participants ranged in age from young children to older adults. All materials for the origami were provided to the attendees. (Raul Roa / Staff Photographer)



Origami Warm-up

The trick wasn't well executed.  I know the flaw/mistake I'm making that's an easy giveaway; but will do better in the future: