Sunday, October 07, 2063

Welcome!

Update 3/9/2014 10:38



Caricature by Lar DeSouza
I'm finally updating the welcome post which is only able to sit at the top of this dated blog because it's post-posted 49 years into the future.  The last update was 7 years ago.

When I first began this blog back in late 2004, It was for the purpose of hosting videos documenting the Westcoast Origami Guild- I believe the longest, most established origami folding group in the greater LA area.

Since that time, Have Paper Will Travel has evolved.  It's more an aggregate blog for all sorts of origami and origami-related items floating around out there that I find interesting; and which I may think readers and followers out there might also find of interest.

There is so much content on the internet these days, it's hard to follow it all.  

My sidebar is one of the largest collections of origami-content links in one place.  FYI, it gets updated periodically with new links as I find them.  I should alert readers whenever I add something new, but haven't been (yet).  If you'd like your site or photo album linked and don't see it in the sidebar (check around very carefully and under the proper category), just let me know.  There are sooooo many photo albums out there (it seems almost every folder on the planet has one), I could spend all day collecting up links and still have more to go.

 I'd like to do what I can to expand the audience and draw more attention to noteworthy sites and folders; to bring more exposure to the art and science of paperfolding; and to bring more people into "the fold".

  There are so many great folders out there on the level of well-known luminaries like Satoshi Kamiya, Brian Chan, and Robert Lang.  I think this especially began to happen after Dr. Lang published "Origami Design Secrets", which I've still not taken the time to sit down and study (let alone fold much from). 

Anyway, thanks to everyone who comes by and takes something of usefulness away from here.  Feel free to drop in a comment for any suggestions.  

I realize that those viewing on mobile devices may have a difficult time reading the lighter colored font.  I still do not like the background layout of what blogger did to this blog and may eventually update the layout again when I have the time and energy to research into it.  In the meantime....

michael

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Tadashi MORI's Origami Leia




















The Aegis of Origami


Portable shield inspired by origami:

The device, developed by Brigham Young University—a private research university in Utah—is a foldable kevlar shield designed to protect officers in high-risk situations. The foldable shield weighs only a little bit more than a suitcase and is made from 12 layers of bullet-proof kevlar. Its folding design was also inspired by origami.
Despite its low weight, the shield is capable of stopping a .44 Magnum, 9mm, and .355 Magnum, according to reports. We will keep you posted on whether or not departments start implementing this device. 






Going from medieval to state of the art through the ancient art of origami technology:


When mechanical engineering professor Larry Howell began work on a new ballistic shield, police officers told him that their current gear was “kind of medieval.”
“Most of them are still basically just … a big chunk of steel with handles on it, and so they tend to be very heavy,” he tells The Christian Science Monitor in a phone interview. Many of them weigh nearly 100 pounds.
But a new folding kevlar shield, developed by Professor Howell, his colleague Terri Bateman, and other faculty and graduate students at Brigham Young University, weighs 55 pounds, fits in the trunk of a car, unfolds in seconds, and covers more than one officer. It can also take a hit from a .44 Magnum handgun without ripping or tipping over.
Together, these features could make the shield much better-suited to police work than current technology.
“It's easily transportable, and it provides protection for more than one officer,” says Chuck Wexler, executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum, after watching video of the shield in action. “So I think that if the test results hold up, this could be an important option for police departments to consider.”
The BYU team derived these advantages from an unlikely source. “Origami artists, over the centuries, had discovered interesting ways to achieve motion that we wouldn't have discovered using our traditional engineering approaches,” Howell explains.
His past work has used origami techniques to shrink NASA payloads and medical devices. Through discussions with federal agents and local police, “We realized that having a compact bulletproof barrier that's easy to transport, easy to stow, and then deploys very quickly, and is light, has a lot of benefits.”
“It seems kind of weird that you could go from origami … to something that's bulletproof,” Howell acknowledges. But by applying a Yoshimura fold pattern to a sheet with 12 layers of Kevlar – plus an aluminum core for stability – the researchers created a shield that can withstand hits from 9-millimeter, .357 Magnum, and .44 Magnum pistols.
A federal agent involved in the testing “said that it was revolutionary,” Howell remembers.

Sunday FunniesS

Source

Friday, February 17, 2017

Origami Revolution on PBS

Haven't even sat down for time to watch this, yet; but the whole community has been buzzing about it.






According to Seth Friedman through "Google trends", searches are up 46% on origami since the NOVA airing.

Monday, December 19, 2016

Christmas Display Sighting

Last Tuesday, I came across this window display at a store on 1st Street in Little Tokyo:











Also saw these containers being sold in Bunkado:




Saturday, December 17, 2016

Return of the Stormtrooper



Storm trooper
Created by Ashimura Shunichi
Folded by Michael Sanders
6" x 6" square of tissue foil
 
I saw Rogue One Thursday evening at 11pm.  

So I'm in a bit of a mood for Star Wars models.  I decided to revisit Ashimura Shunichi's Stormtrooper model; and this time, I looked at an image of an actual Stormtrooper helmet to help me with how I decided to shape this model.  I'm more satisfied with this effort than with my previous one.


Monday, December 12, 2016